Industry News
Written by Grant Cameron
Jon Pegg, Ontario’s newly installed fire marshal, says he’s excited about working to protect firefighters and the public and promoting diversity in the fire service.

“I look forward to working with and hearing from our many stakeholders on the many challenges they face and coming up with collaborative and creative ways to address those problems,” he said in a statement prepared for Fire Fighting in Canada.

“Ultimately, I look forward to finding innovative ways to educate and protect our residents and to a day when fatalities caused by fire are virtually eliminated.”

Pegg took over the helm on Feb. 20, replacing Ross Nichols who retired. He is no stranger to public fire and life safety, as he has been chief of emergency management for the Province of Ontario for the past eight months.

Pegg has a long history in the fire service and started as a firefighter with the Richmond Hill Fire Department in 2000. He has been deputy chief and fire chief for the Innisfil Fire and Rescue Services as well as deputy fire chief for the Town of Georgina.

He said he’s looking forward to the job and challenges.

I think what I am excited about is actually the same as the biggest challenge – the diversity within the fire service across Ontario and recognizing that diversity,” he said, as well as how the Office of the Fire Marshal meets those often different needs.

He said his 23 years in various fire roles, as volunteer, career firefighter and captain, deputy chief and chief will help as he’s been fortunate to have been part of some amazing departments and teams.

“I have worked in the most common types of departments (volunteer, composite and career) we see in Ontario which I believe will be a great asset in this role.”

Pegg said he was drawn to the role of fire marshal because in that role he can help shape the fire service in Ontario.

“I am passionate about fire safety and protecting the residents within Ontario,” he said. “I am passionate about firefighter safety (physical and mental).

“I have greatly enjoyed each rank I have held as my career has progressed and I truly see being in the role of fire marshal as that next step. Being able to work with the municipal fire departments and stakeholders to shape the fire service with things like legislation, education and best practices is very exciting for me.”

He said the fire marshal’s office and office of emergency management are very fortunate to have incredibly intelligent and hardworking people working within the teams.

“I am excited to lead and work with these women and men to enhance fire safety throughout Ontario.”

Pegg said he’s incredibly fortunate to be taking over the role after Nichols, and he saw the incredible way his predecessor interacted and valued his staff.

“Although there are many great things I can say about Ross, this is something that will always stick with me. Ross was a very trusted and respected leader who put his people first 100 per cent of the time and this is something I hope I can continue to bring to the team.”

For the time being, Pegg also remains in his role as chief of emergency management.
Written by Grant Cameron
Jon Pegg is the new fire marshal for the Province of Ontario. He started the job Feb. 20 and replaces Ross Nichols.

Pegg has been chief of emergency management for the Province of Ontario for the past eight months.

He has a long history in the fire service and started as a firefighter with the Richmond Hill Fire Department in 2000.

He left in 2011 to become deputy fire chief at the Town of Innisfil and remained there for 16 months. He oversaw the suppression, training and prevention divisions and assisted in the development of a council-adopted fire master plan.

He became deputy fire chief of the Town of Georgina in April 2013 and remained in that job for a year.

He was also Zone 4 rep for the Ontario Association of Fire Chiefs for a year at that time.

In March 2014, Pegg became fire chief and community emergency management co-ordinator of the Town of Innisfil, where he oversaw all components of the Innisfil Fire and Rescue Service.

His focus has been on constantly looking to find better, safer practices for fire fighting, to serve residents and protect staff, and create a 100-per-cent customer service environment where staff make going above and beyond expectations part of their daily routine to serve the public.

Pegg is the brother of Toronto Fire Services Chief Matthew Pegg.

Click here to read more about Pegg's plans for the future.
Written by Grant Cameron
On Feb. 18, his final day as Fire Marshal of Ontario, Ross Nichols thanked first responders for making Ontario a safer place to live.

He posted a public letter and statement on Twitter to the women and men on the front line, thanking them for their service.

“On this, my final day as Fire Marshal of Ontario, I’m sending out a thank you to all those in the first responder community who have chosen to serve,” he wrote. “To our police officers, firefighters, paramedics, call-takers and dispatchers … thank you for all you do. Be well, and play safe.”

In the letter, he said that each and every day first responders roll out into the unknown, putting themselves in harm’s way in service to the public.

“Whether it’s the middle of the night or in broad daylight, ridiculously hot or unbelievably cold, downtown in a major city or hours from the nearest community, paid or volunteering, you’re there for people on their most difficult days – helping them when they need it most.”

In these increasingly challenging times, he said, the role of first responder demands a great deal from those willing to put it all on the line to help their fellow citizens.

“You see and do the things most people don’t want (to) see and do … or simply aren’t able to do,” he wrote. “As a result, it’s vital that we support each other – not just physically, but mentally as well.

“Please look after each other both on and off the street,” he wrote.

Many from the first responder community responded to Ross’s tweet, congratulating him on his retirement and for his service.

Toronto Fire Services Fire Chief Matthew Pegg wrote, “Thank you Ross! I wish you all the best in your next adventure and thank you for your public service.”

Grand Falls-Windsor, N.L., Fire Chief Vince MacKenzie said, “Congratulations Ross and thank you for your leadership and service to Ontario and across Canada. It was a pleasure to meet and work with you. Best wishes from Newfoundland and Labrador Fire Service.”

The Ontario Provincial Police wrote, “Happy retirement! All the very best,” and the Police Association of Ontario wrote, “Thank you for your service! On behalf of the @PoliceAssocON’s 18,000 front-line police personnel members across the province, all the best in your future endeavours.”

Jon Pegg, chief of emergency management for the province, has been named as the new fire marshal.

Click here to see Ross’s tweet.

Written by Grant Cameron
The Home Fire Sprinkler Coalition Canada (HFSC) is awarding stipends to 20 qualifying fire departments that demonstrate a plan to conduct a community event featuring a side-by-side fire and sprinkler burn demonstration.

The stipend can be used to purchase materials to build a new display, rehab an existing display, produce educational materials distributed at the demonstration or to build an NFPA 13D display to be used at the event. 
Click here for more information about building an NFPA 13D display.

The deadline to apply for the stipend is March 1, 2019.

To qualify, applicants must be signed up for HFSC’s free Built for Life Fire Department program. 

To apply for the stipend, Built For Life Fire Department representatives must agree to implement their department’s event and fulfill the event implementation requirements by the end of 2019. They must ensure the event contains home fire sprinkler educational outreach; endeavour to extend the educational benefits beyond the actual event (such as through local media or placement of photos or video on the fire department’s website and social media outlets, if any); evaluate the educational effectiveness of the event; and report event summary and evaluation findings to the HFSC.

Click here for more information and to enrol.

The HFSC is a charitable organiztion that was formed in 1996 to inform the public about the life-saving value of home fire sprinkler protection in Canada. HFSC members include The Co-operators, the Canadian Automatic Sprinkler Association and regional representation for the National Fire Protection Association.
Written by Laura King
Aug. 1, 2017 – Fire-service equipment provider MSA has completed its $215-million acquisition of gear maker Globe.

MSA chairman and CEO William Lambert said Monday the transaction boosts the company’s position as a leader in the North American market for firefighter personal protective equipment .

“Globe is a highly recognized and respected brand of firefighter turnout gear, which very nicely complements our own line of firefighter protective equipment,” Lambert said in a press release.

“With virtually no product overlap, the acquisition aligns well with our corporate strategy in that it expands our core product portfolio in a key customer segment.”

Lambert said MSA can now help to protect firefighters from head to toe, with Cairns Helmets, the G1 self-contained breathing apparatus, and Globe turnout gear and boots.

MSA said Globe Manufacturing’s management team, including previous owners Don Welch, Rob Freese and Gef Freese, will continue to work for the company over the short term to ensure an effective transition.

Pittsfield, N.H.-based Globe is North America’s oldest and largest maker of firefighter protective clothing, having been founded in 1887. Globe launched its Athletix line of bunker gear in April.

MSA entered the breathing apparatus market in 1917; it has focused in the last few years on the customizable G1 SCBA and integrated thermal imaging camera.

MSA is based north of Cranberry Township, Pa.; it employs about 4,300 people worldwide, and has revenues of U.S. $1.15 billion in 2016.

Welch said when the deal was announced June 28 that it is a good fit for both parties, and ensures a solid future for Globe.
Written by IAFF Firefighters
The IAFF welcomes the federal government’s announcement of $80 million for a national Community Heroes Benefit for the families of Canada’s fallen fire fighters and other public safety officers. Ottawa's Mar. 22 announcement, is the culmination of a longstanding IAFF lobby for a public safety officer compensation (PSOC) benefit.

The IAFF commends Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, the Liberal Government and Ralph Goodale, Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, for listening to the IAFF and other first responder agencies and for following through on a commitment to address this longstanding and important issue.

Goodale has been a long-time champion of the benefit. It was a key element of his private member’s motion, M-388, which was adopted in the House of Commons in 2012, and he moved the item forward swiftly after he was appointed Minister in 2015.

Thanks also go to the many IAFF members who helped lobby the issue on Parliament Hill at every edition of the IAFF Canadian Legislative Conference since 1992.

“The IAFF commends the Liberal Government for keeping its promise and for establishing a Community Heroes Benefit in Budget 2017,” says General President Harold Schaitberger. “This benefit will allow a grateful nation to formally recognize the sacrifices made by fallen fire fighters and other public safety officers and will ensure once and for all that their families don’t have to worry about their immediate financial security.”

The benefit, a one-time, tax-free and direct payment to the surviving family of fire fighters, police, paramedics and other public safety officers who die in the line of duty, establishes a minimum baseline of compensation that the survivors of all public safety officers across Canada are entitled to, regardless of the city or province in which they worked.

Budget 2017 provides $80 million over five years beginning in 2018-2019 for the benefit and $20 million thereafter.
Written by Maria Church
March 7, 2016 - Nozzle maker Task Force Tips, Inc., (TFT) has acquired AMKUS Rescue Systems, both companies announced on their websites last week. 

Indiana-based TFT manufactures nozzles, monitors, valves and foam systems. Headquartered in Illinois, AMKUS’s line of rescue products includes cutters, spreaders, push-pull rams, power units, auxiliary pumps and rope-rescue systems. 

AMKUS, according to a joint news release, will maintain its identity, distribution network and field managers, however all engineering, service and manufacturing operations will eventually transition to TFT’s headquarters in Valparaiso, Ind. 

“Task Force Tips' passion for developing products that save lives and protect property is a perfect fit for the continued expansion of the AMKUS Rescue System's product line,” the company stated in the release. 

Learn more at www.tft.com and www.amkus.com
Written by Maria Church
March 3, 2016 - The Alberta government is spending $650,000 to support fire and emergency-preparedness training for first responders in 50 municipalities and four First Nations. 

The funding is part of a Fire Services Emergency Preparedness Program aimed at volunteer and mutual-aid fire departments. The program will provide $500,000 for fire training and $150,000 for emergency management training in 2016. 

The grant program, according to a government news release, will help first responders develop the skills needed to respond effectively during fire and emergency events. 

“Local firefighters and emergency responders provide an invaluable service to their communities,” Danielle Larivee, Minister of Muncipal Affairs, said in the release. “Our government is proud to invest in emergency preparedness training as just one of the ways we will continue to help these individuals who help others.” 

Municipalities and First Nations that have mutual-aid agreements were given application priority, according to the release. 

For more information, including a list of the recipients, go to www.ofc.alberta.ca/grant-funded-training
Written by Maria Church
March 3, 2016 - In 1991, Kip Cosgrove moved to Canada to fill a market niche: to provide a national insurance option for firefighters.

Cosgrove brought the United States-based insurance company VFIS north of the border and at the 1991 International Association of Fire Chiefs conference held in Toronto, VFIS of Canada was launched.

"Because the program was so successful in the United States," Cosgrove said, "they felt that, hey, the Canadian fire service is very similar. Fighting fires is no different in Canada than in the U.S."

Now in its 25th year of business, VFIS of Canada insures more than 2,100 fire departments across the country.

VFIS of Canada pioneered several benefits that are now market standards, Cosgrove said, including cosmetic disfigurement from burns, and heart and circulatory malfunction.

Cosgrove is well known in the industry thanks to his presence at many conferences and trade shows. VFIS sponsors several associations and charities, finances educational guest speakers, and offers free educational programs to its clients.

"Today the volunteer firefighters needs to grab everything they can, and we really are giving them access to a lot of these great tools free of charge," Cosgrove said in an interview.

"If they weren't buying my program, I wouldn't be able to offer back anything, but because our program is taking off, we want to give back to the fire service."

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