Extrication
Written by Randy Schmitz
With advancements in automobile-safety technology over the last 10 to 15 years, steady progress has been made in the development of techniques to safely remove passengers from motor-vehicle collisions. Today, most emergency response personnel use established methods of extrication, such as dash lifts, side-outs and roof removals.
Written by Randy Schmitz
As driver comfort and safety become more important to car buyers, it’s crucial for rescuers to understand the myriad occupant-safety devices in today’s vehicles.
Written by Randy Schmitz
I test a lot of products for companies; not all of them get good reviews.
Written by Randy Schmitz
Most of you who follow this column can identify a theme, which is how to become more efficient and reduce time at a rescue scene
Written by Randy Schmitz
In the January issue of Canadian Firefighter and EMS Quarterly, we looked at methods and tools that save time when removing patients who have been involved in motor vehicle collisions.
In this video supplement, Canadian Firefighter and EMS Quarterly columnist, Randy Schmitz demonstrates how to cut the high-tension cables of a HTCB system – which should only be done as a last resort.
In this video supplement, Canadian Firefighter and EMS Quarterly columnist, Randy Schmitz demonstrates how to knock over the cable release post of a high-tension cable barrier.
In this video supplement, Canadian Firefighter and EMS Quarterly columnist, Randy Schmitz demonstrates one method of releasing the tension in a high-tension cable barrier.
Written by Randy Schmitz
When it comes to the golden hour, any process, method or tool that helps to reduce that critical time frame for patient rescue is a clear benefit.  
Written by Randy Schmitz
In the July issue of Canadian Firefighter and EMS Quarterly, I outlined the design and functionality of the high-tension cable barrier (HTCB) system.
Written by Randy Schmitz
Over the last few years, the Province of Alberta’s efforts to improve highway safety have included roadway engineering to help drivers keep their cars on the road and to reduce the safety consequences when they fail to do so.
Written by Randy Schmitz
In part two of my hand tools series, in the January issue of Canadian Firefighter and EMS Quarterly, we looked at a few different applications for the First Responder Jack (FRJ) in extrication.
Written by Randy Schmitz
In the October 2012 issue of Canadian Firefighter and EMS Quarterly, we focused on the First Responder Jack (FRJ). Now let’s look at uses for the FRJ in a rescue application.
Written by Randy Schmitz
Editor’s note: This multi-part series on the evolution of hand tools will detail alternative options to hydraulic tools so you’ll know what to do when the need arises.
Written by Randy Schmitz
Innovations in the car industry continuously create new challenges for rescuers.
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