Extrication
Written by Randy Schmitz
Attacking latch mechanisms to gain vehicle-compartment access on today’s vehicles may require a little adjustment.
Written by Randy Schmitz
Vehicle safety has improved in recent years.
Written by Randy Schmitz
In my last Extrication Tips column, in July, the focus was on moving a vehicle to access a victim.
Written by Randy Schmitz
Being a part of the extrication community allows me to attend trade shows and seminars and keep abreast of what’s happening in the industry.
Written by Randy Schmitz
Many of us have responded to calls at which patients are trapped inside their vehicles against trees, hydro poles or other vehicles. If rescuers could access victims from the damaged side of the vehicle, extrication could be a snap, but the only way to do that is to move the vehicle off the impinging object. Rescuers have been told for years never to move a vehicle with a victim inside. Generally, I agree with this concept but there are exceptions to every rule. However, extrication instructors do not want emergency responders to believe that the solution to pinned or trapped patients begins with moving the vehicle. Moving the vehicle is an option but it is the exception, not the rule.
Written by Randy Schmitz
When rescuers attend collisions involving trapped or pinned patients, standard extrication evolutions such as roof-and-door removal or dash lifts and rolls are often sufficient for removal of the occupants.
Written by Randy Schmitz
Side-impact crashes account for almost 30 per cent of collisions in North America and are the second-leading cause of death and injury to vehicle occupants. More than 10,000 people on North American roadways are killed annually from these types of crashes (1,000 in Canada; 9,000 in the United States).
Written by Randy Schmitz
When we started this year-long big-rig project in January, I promised an exam to test your knowledge. I hope you’ve learned from the last three Extrication Tips columns and that you will be able to apply those lessons if necessary.
Written by Randy Schmitz
A year ago, in the August 2009 edition of Fire Fighting in Canada, we talked about new vehicle technology and the challenges it presents for rescuers.
Written by Randy Schmitz
In part 2 of big rig rescue in April we talked about arrival, inner and outer surveys, hazard control stabilization and interior rescuer duties once inside the cab. Here, our focus is on disentanglement, lifting options and procedures to gain access to the involved vehicles.
Written by Randy Schmitz
In the January column on big rig rescue, we discussed the anatomy of large trucks and trailers and a few late-model design characteristics that pertain to their construction. Here, we will focus on arrival, assessment, stabilization and interior rescue duties.
Written by Randy Schmitz
In September, I instructed at a two-day big rig rescue symposium in Nisku, Alta. The other two lead instructors were Billy Leach Jr. from North Carolina and George Klemm from Vancouver Island.
Written by Randy Schmitz
In June I had an opportunity to work on concrete truck rollover accident simulations. The idea came to me after my department responded to a concrete-truck-versus-car accident that resulted in five fatalities – an entire family taken in the blink of an eye.
Written by Randy Schmitz
New vehicle technology, or NVT, seems to be the buzz-word in extrication these days. Today’s vehicles are safer, smaller and more fuel-efficient. The legislated improvements to Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) 214 and, most recently, 216, deal with side and roof strength and also the integrity of motor vehicles.
Written by Randy Schmitz
When it comes to patient removal from crashed vehicles there are many options to be considered regarding the path of egress – issues such as access to the patient, degree or level of entrapment, and compartment intrusion. Rescuers need to determine the safest, most effective and least time-consuming path of patient egress based on the patient’s condition.
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