Fire Ground
Written by Tim Llewellyn
Numerous fire department-related articles and speakers have echoed the notion that in order for us (career and volunteer) to be as proficient as possible in our duties as firefighters, we must participate in some type of regular, realistic training or practice.
Written by Grant Cameron
Firefighters should brace for more forest and wildland blazes across Canada in 2019 – and future years – because it will be the new norm.
Written by Mark van der Feyst
In our last issue, we began our look at self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) emergencies and the four different categories that they fall into.
Written by Mark van der Feyst
I have been looking at the mayday function of firefighter survival in the past few issues and how important it is to the survivability of each firefighter.
Written by Lance Bushie
In previous articles, I have discussed the need for live-fire training and given readers a deeper understanding of what heat is. In this article, I will delve into the interactions of steam and how it interacts with fire extinguishment and can cause burns to a firefighter.
Written by Grant Cameron
Registration is now open for the 2018 Firefighter Training Day being held Saturday, Sept. 29, 2018 at the GTAA Fire and Emergency Services Training Institute (FESTI) at 2025 Courtneypark Drive East in Toronto.

The day-long program gives volunteer, part-time and full-time firefighters the opportunity to expand their training and enhance their skills.

Active members of volunteer/career fire departments are welcome to participate (with their chief’s approval). Training is free.

The event is sponsored by FESTI, Fort Garry Fire Trucks, FLIR, Canadian Firefighter and Fire Fighting in Canada.

Click here for the website.

Click here for the registration page.


Written by Mark Van der Feyst
Whenever a mayday is called, it is for an emergency that requires help. The hope of the caller is that when the message is received by another person, help will be sent or given. In the fire service we use this term as a way for the firefighter to call for help.
Written by Tim Llewellyn
It was a brisk morning in early spring when a conscientious jogger happened to run past a home where the smoke alarm was sounding. Through the early morning mist, he could hear the telltale beeping that signalled trouble.
Written by Lance Bushie
Firefighters must understand what heat is and different heat phenomenon like heat flux and heat release rates to understand how to stay safe. In the past five years, new research has changed how firefighters think about fire growth, spread and extinguishment.
Written by Mark van der Feyst
In the January issue of Canadian Firefighter, and part 3 of this series, we looked at taking the necessary action step of orientation. Now, we are going to look at the second action step, which is communication. Communication allows the incident commander (IC) to address the rescue situation as well provide the rapid intervention team (RIT) with the information they need to successfully rescue the firefighter.
Written by David Moseley
Sometimes we need to be taught a lesson or two, and sometimes the crucible of fire does just that. It’s long been said in the fire service that we should learn something from every call we attend. One memorable fire in particular taught me several valuable lessons I needed – this is what I learned from getting burned.
Written by Mark van der Feyst
When  firefighters call for a mayday, they are informing everybody that they need help. Whatever the situation may be, they are in need of assistance and the first step is to call a mayday.
Written by Mark Van der Feyst
My series on firefighter survival (see part 1, Canadian Firefighter, July 2017) focuses on the mayday call. A mayday call is for firefighters only, never for patients or for any other fire-ground emergency. When a mayday is called, everyone on scene knows a firefighter needs help.
Written by Tim Llewellyn
In each edition of Tim-bits, I select a topic or technique that was introduced in recruit academies and became engrained as fire-service doctrine, then offer a field-tested and street-smart modification to make the practice easier, safer or more effective.
Written by Mark van der Feyst
In the last few issues, we have built a foundation of key firefighter survival skills and an understanding of the importance of having these skills. We will now build upon that foundation with some integral survival strategies, beginning with mayday calls.
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